The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) says 37.5 million US adults “report some trouble hearing.” It’s likely hearing loss numbers are higher than this due to the considerable number of adults who don’t report it.

People of all ages can experience hearing loss, and the reasons behind it vary from ear infections to a loud work environment to certain health conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure. Age can also be a contributing factor, especially for men in the 60 to 69 age group.

The American Journal of Industrial Medicine has reported that about 12% of all workers have difficulty hearing and it impacts their daily activities. It also says that 13% of workers who are in a loud work environment have hearing loss in both ears.

Many young people who use headphones a lot and who are frequently around loud noise events have the same experience.

Why Do People Live with an Untreated Hearing Loss?

The brain attempts to adjust as hearing loss progresses and because it’s so gradual, you simply might not realize that it’s a problem until it starts affecting your workability and relationships.

Individuals who suspect hearing loss might believe that hearing aids are a sign of aging and handicap. They believe that if they don’t get hearing aids, their family and friends won’t know that they have a hearing loss.

However, family and friends already know and have stepped in to compensate, making it less of a problem for the person who can’t hear as easily, rather than encouraging them to come see us for a hearing assessment. People Wait Seven Years on Average Before Addressing A Hearing Challenge.

Individuals believe there is a stigma involved with hearing aids. In their minds, they equate hearing aids to aging and handicap.

Studies have found that this is only true of older individuals, but younger people don’t think hearing aids are any different than eyeglasses. We are encouraged by this changing perspective.

Most people who accept that they can’t hear as well as they used to and realize the adverse effects of their hearing loss get evaluated and treated. We have seen the difference treatment makes in so many lives.

At West Coast Hearing & Balance Center, we offer a “Hear as Good as You’ll Ever Hear” guarantee, making sure every patient gets the best possible outcome with their treatment choices.

What are The Most Common Signs of Hearing Loss?

  • Individuals ask people to repeat themselves often.
  • They misunderstand what people say and reply with the wrong answer.
  • They turn the television up very loud.
  • They don’t interact socially with others since they cannot understand the conversation and they start to avoid going out anywhere that has background noise.
  • They avoid using the phone because it’s too hard to hear what’s being said.
  • Tinnitus can sometimes be an indicator of early-stage hearing loss.

How Can You Identify Hearing Loss in a Loved One?

  • Do people seem to mumble or talk in a softer voice than they used to?
  • When in a crowd or in a busy restaurant, is it hard for you to follow the discussion?
  • Do you feel the need to turn up the volume on your TV or radio such that it is too loud for others?
  • Do you often need to ask others to repeat themselves?

Your Next Steps

If you answered yes to any of the previous four questions, you should call your doctor of audiology for an examination.

This is the only way to determine if you have a hearing loss. We’ll do a non-invasive physical, diagnostic, and acoustic exam to identify any irregularities in your hearing system and then review those results with you to discuss your auditory health and offer treatments, if needed, that suit you and your lifestyle best.

No matter what your challenge, we’ve seen it before, having helped thousands of people across Los Angeles.

Whether you have a question, a concern, or you need help, then please know that we are here for you.

Contact us to make your hearing assessment appointment.

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Hang Lam, AuD.

Dr. Hang Lam graduated with an AuD from UC San Diego/San Diego State University's joint audiology program in 2014. She completed her audiology internship and remained on staff following graduation. She is experienced with working with all age groups and populations. Dr. Lam is a member of the Academy of Doctors of Audiology and the American Academy of Audiology. Hang speaks Vietnamese and enjoys hiking, camping, backpacking, snowboarding, archery, disc golf, cooking, acoustic guitar, arts and craft projects, jewelry making, painting, flower pressing, and cross-stitching.